T

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Page 1: Table Football - Target Renegade
Page 2: Targhan - Teenage Queen
Page 3: Tempest - Terres et Conquérants
Page 4: Terrormolinos - Think!
Page 5: Thomas the Tank Engine - 3D Snooker
Page 6: 3D Starfighter - Thunderbirds
Page 7: Thunder Blade - Time Out
Page 8: Time Scanner - TLL
Page 9: Toadrunner - Total Recall
Page 10: Totems - Trance
Page 11: Transmuter - Tribble Trouble
Page 12: Trigger - Tubaruba
Page 13: Tujad - Turlogh le Rôdeur
Page 14: Turrican - 2112 AD
Page 15: Typhoon
Screenshot of Totems
Totems
(ESP Soft, 2012)

This game is a version of the Sega classic Columns with a distinctly Egyptian theme. Columns of three blocks, each engraved with a symbol, fall from the top of the screen, and you must create horizontal, vertical or diagonal lines of three or more matching symbols. It's a simple concept which is quite similar to Tetris. The graphics are beautifully drawn using the CPC's four-colour mode, and several playing modes are included – classical, stage mode (achieve a score within a set time limit), time attack (score as many points as possible within three minutes), and a two-player 'versus' mode. This is an excellent game and is much better than ESP Soft's previous version of Columns.

More information on CPCSOFTS

9

Screenshot of Tournament Snooker
Tournament Snooker
(Magnificent 7, 1986)

There are a lot of snooker simulators for the CPC and this is one of the earlier ones, which was later re-released by Codemasters as Professional Snooker Simulator. The first thing you'll notice about it is that it's in four colours, which is a bit strange when you need at least eight. Even though it says which ball is which on the screen, it is still confusing, and not only that, the method of aiming is awkward; instead of pointing a cursor at your target ball, you must rotate the cue about the white ball, and the strange controls make this tricky to get right. From all of this, you'd think there wasn't much reason to rate this game – and you'd be absolutely right.

More information on CPCSOFTS

5

Screenshot of Tour 91
Tour 91
(Topo Soft, 1991)

Take part in a cycling race held over four stages, and try to amass the shortest time possible over all the stages. The first and last stages are viewed from the side and require a lot of joystick waggling to build up and maintain your speed, while the second and third stages are viewed from overhead, and don't require any joystick waggling. You have to finish within the top six to go to the next stage, although a training mode is also available. The graphics are brilliant and really colourful – I like the animation of the crowd cheering the cyclists – and there's a jolly tune to accompany all of the action if you have 128K of memory. You don't have to waggle the joystick really hard, though, and all in all, the game is good fun.

More information on CPCSOFTS

7

Screenshot of Track and Field
Track and Field
(Ocean, 1988)
Reviewed by CPC4eva

Based on Konami's 1983 coin-op game, the Amstrad CPC version by Ocean was released as part of their Game, Set and Match 2 compilation and comprises six sporting events to compete in – the 100-metre dash, the javelin, the long jump, the 110-metre hurdles, hammer throwing and the high jump. You can start at an easy level and progress through the events rather smoothly, hurdles probably being the hardest of the lot. Every time you reach a new world record, you are rewarded with it being shown up in lights. The qualifying times or distances are very reachable and when you complete all six events you start back at the first event and the qualifying times and distances become more challenging. I quite enjoyed playing the CPC version; the only problem is that it's one of those infuriating joystick waggling type of games.

More information on CPCSOFTS

7

Screenshot of Tracksuit Manager
Tracksuit Manager
(Goliath, 1988)

Your country failed miserably in the World Cup, and having been appointed as the new manager, you must concentrate on the Nations Cup before preparing your team for the next World Cup. The game features all the players from over 50 countries, which is pretty good, although unless you play England, you're going to have to spend ages entering player details in. For some reason, a lot of people seemed to like this game. I don't; it's text only, for a start, and the match highlights go on for as long as ten minutes while a running commentary appears on the screen – not exciting stuff at all.

More information on CPCSOFTS

4

Screenshot of Traffic
Traffic
(Amsoft/Andromeda, 1985)

Anyone who has ever been to London (or any other city in England, for that matter) will know how bad the traffic jams can be. You've been appointed the head traffic controller, and have to change the traffic lights manually so that the traffic flows smoothly. Inevitably, queues of cars build up and go off the screen, and if they become too large, the game ends. What is a novel concept for a game gives way to frustration after about a quarter of an hour. The graphics are awful with the cars represented as boxes, the sound effects are equally bad, and the game quickly becomes very monotonous.

More information on CPCSOFTS

3

Screenshot of Trailblazer
Trailblazer
(Gremlin, 1986)

A colourful and exciting game in which you control a bouncing football and have to reach the other end of a course which is made up of coloured tiles – and lots of chasms, which of course you mustn't fall into. The tiles affect the ball in different ways depending on their colour. The course scrolls towards you so fast that you barely have time to look ahead, so remembering the layout of all fourteen courses is vital if you want to complete them. Fortunately, there's a practice mode which gives you lots of time to complete each course. The graphics are excellent and the scrolling is really fast and smooth, and the music only adds to the thrill and the tension – it's great stuff.

More information on CPCSOFTS

9

Screenshot of The Train
The Train
(Accolade/Electronic Arts, 1988)
Reviewed by CPC4eva

It's 1944 and occupied France is on the cusp of being liberated by Allied forces. The German army is retreating back to Berlin on a train carrying France's valuable art collection. As part of the French Resistance, you must stop the Germans and take the train to Rivière. Starting at the Metz train yards, you must avoid German soldiers shooting at you from buildings. From this point onwards the game becomes more involved as you engineer and navigate the train safely to your destination. It's not easy; you must shoot down fighter planes and capture enemy train stations and bridges to protect the train and artwork from damage. The graphics are detailed, respresenting the theme admirably. The gameplay has a lot of staying power to keep you hooked; you just want one more go at taking the train from the German army.

More information on CPCSOFTS

7

Screenshot of Trakers
Trakers
(Cybervision, 1991)

An expedition of robots went to explore the planet Magellanx. Unfortunately, they left little Trakers behind, and now he's got to find 10,000 credits to get back to Earth. As soon as you play it, you'll realise that the game is based on the Dizzy series, where objects can be collected and used to solve puzzles. However, there are also lots of creatures to avoid, and some of them are far too tricky. The graphics are nice and cute and the sound effects are OK, but you'll become very frustrated at how quickly you lose your nine lives.

More information on CPCSOFTS

7

Screenshot of Trance
Trance
(Remon, 1989)

Have you ever wanted to get lost in a trance and achieve a comatose state? Apparently, it can be achieved if you complete the six levels of this immensely challenging puzzle game. You have to fit twelve pentagonal shapes on to a sphere, and ensure that the numbers on each side of the pentagons match adjacent numbers in some way. It's every bit as confusing as it sounds! A prize was offered for the first person to complete this game, but I doubt if anyone ever did! I'm going to lie down and recover now (and get away from all those puns on the word 'trance')...

More information on CPCSOFTS

5

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Previous Home Next