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Page 1: Sabian Island - Saint and Greavsie
Page 2: St. Dragon - SAS Combat Simulator
Page 3: SAS Strike Force - Scooby Doo
Page 4: Scoop - SDI
Page 5: Seabase Delta - Sgt. Helmet Training Day 2020
Page 6: Sergeant Seymour Robotcop - Shadow Skimmer
Page 7: The Shadows of Sergoth - Sherman M4
Page 8: Shinobi - Sideral War
Page 9: Sidewalk - Sir Fred
Page 10: Sir Lancelot - Skatin' USA
Page 11: Skool Daze - Slightly Magic
Page 12: Slug - Snooker Management
Page 13: Snoopy - Software House
Page 14: Software Star - Sootland
Page 15: Sooty and Sweep - Space Ace
Page 16: Space Cowboy in Lost Planet - Space Moves (Retrobytes Productions)
Page 17: Space Moves (#CPCRetroDev) - Speedzone
Page 18: Spellbound - Spirits
Page 19: Spitfire - Sputnik
Page 20: Spy Hunter - Star Avenger
Page 21: Star Bowls - Starglider
Page 22: Starion - Star Trooper
Page 23: Star Wars - Stop-Ball
Page 24: Storm - Street Gang
Page 25: Street Gang Football - Strike Force Cobra
Page 26: Striker - Stuntman Seymour
Page 27: Sub - Sultan's Maze
Page 28: Summer Games - Super Hero
Page 29: Superkid - Super Scramble Simulator
Page 30: Super Seymour Saves the Planet - SuperTed: The Search for Spot
Page 31: Super Tripper - Survivre
Page 32: Suspended - Syntax
Screenshot of Starion

Starion

(Melbourne House, 1985)

Aliens have caused chaos in the space-time continuum by removing objects from time zones and scrambling them into other time zones. You're the bold pilot who has to venture into the time zones, retrieve the objects, and put them back in their correct places. It's not as simple as it sounds – the objects are really anagrams, and each letter is collected by shooting alien spacecraft. You then have to work out what the anagram is, although you're given clues when you enter a zone. The game features very fast vector graphics, and with nine sectors and nine time zones in each sector (and an anagram for each one!), this game is going to last you a long time.

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Screenshot of Starquake

Starquake

(Bubble Bus, 1986)

An unstable planet has suddenly appeared from out of nowhere, and Blob, the Biologically Operated Being, has landed on the planet in order to repair its core before it explodes. The core consists of nine parts which you must find within the vast caverns of the planet – and there are 512 screens! Fortunately there is a teleportation network which you can use, but you need to know the correct codes. Blob flies around the caverns using hover pads, but some objects can't be picked up if you are using a pad, and you also can't use the teleports. You have a supply of platforms to raise your height, but these are limited. This is a wonderful game and an absolute joy to play. The game might be a bit too large, but exploring the caverns is such fun that it doesn't really matter.

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Screenshot of Star Raiders II

Star Raiders II

(Electric Dreams, 1987)

The Celos IV star range is under attack from the Zylons. You must stop them from destroying all the cities on the four planets of the Celos IV system, and in turn, destroy all of their bases within their own Procyon star range. The action sees you zooming over the planets, blasting Zylon fighters and destroyers, and then travelling to a space station for repairs – and doing it all over again, and again. Your spacecraft also has shields and a Surface Star Burst, or SSB, which is used to destroy Zylon bases. The graphics are fairly simple, although the explosions are spectacular and the scrolling of the planet's surface produces a great pseudo-3D effect. It's a game that will appeal to shoot-'em-up fans, although ultimately it is a bit repetitive in the long term.

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Screenshot of Star Ranger

Star Ranger

(Tynesoft, 1986)

This is a version of the classic Lunar Lander with a few bells and whistles added. Firstly, the simple line-drawn graphics of the original have been replaced by much more colourful graphics. The sound effects are decent as well, and there's the added problem of dodging flying rocks. There's only one screen, though, in which you have to land your spacecraft on four landing areas – misjudge the landing, though, and you lose one of your six lives. You've also got to watch your fuel level! The second level (using the same screen) is harder, as you must also avoid laser beams. Sadly, the difficulty is so high that it's doubtful that you will complete the second level.

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Screenshot of Starring Charlie Chaplin

Starring Charlie Chaplin

(US Gold, 1987)

Have you ever wanted to make your own 1920s-style silent movie starring Charlie Chaplin's famous Little Tramp character? This game offers you this opportunity, but it proves to be quite disappointing. You select one of eight scripts, and then you film each scene in the script one at a time, with each scene lasting about a minute. This involves moving Charlie around the screen and repeatedly knocking other actors to the ground, or letting them do the same to you. You can then watch what you've filmed and shoot it again if you're not satisfied. Once filming is completed, you can release it, watch it in its entirety and wait to see what Variety magazine thinks of it. The main problems are that there's very little you can do when you're filming the scenes, and the option to edit each scene really offers nothing of the sort at all.

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Screenshot of Star Sabre

Star Sabre

(Cronosoft, 2008)

Fast and furious shoot-'em-up action is what you'll get in this game. Pilot your spaceship through four levels of mayhem and dodge the waves of aliens and scenery, as well as all the bullets that are fired in your general direction. Every so often, you can collect bonus icons to improve your firepower, and as well as an end-of-level monster, you also have to deal with a similarly powerful alien spaceship halfway through each level. In short, nearly all of the ingredients of a typical shoot-'em-up can be found in this game. Although there is no music to listen to, and there are only four levels, the graphics are beautiful and the scrolling is very smooth, even when there are a lot of aliens on the screen, and it's definitely a game that is well worth checking out. There is also a 128K edition which contains lots of enhancements to make it even better!

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Screenshot of Starstrike II

Starstrike II

(Firebird, 1986)

The Federation is planning a pre-emptive strike on the Outsiders, using their new generation Starstrike II spaceship. This will not be an easy task, as there are 22 Outsider planets to be penetrated, and they are spread across five solar systems. Each planet is either agricultural, industrial or military, which determines how heavily defended it is and what types of gameplay you will be playing. Your fuel and shields are limited, although fuel can be used to replenish your shields. Fortunately you can replenish both by returning to your support module. This shoot-'em-up is a big advancement on its predecessor, with significantly improved 3D graphics and a greater variety in the gameplay – definitely a game that is not to be missed!

See also: 3D Starstrike.

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Screenshot of Starting Blocks

Starting Blocks

(Coktel Vision, 1988)

Five events are bundled into this game; the 400m sprint, parachuting, the 50m swim, the ski jump, and track cycling. For a game that fills up nearly an entire disc, that's not a lot! Four of the events involve some furious joystick waggling, although thankfully the keyboard can also be used. The parachuting event involves positioning yourself to land on a target, while the ski jump requires both joystick waggling and ensuring that you land correctly. You can practice the events, or play all five at once, competing as either Africa, America, Europe, or Asia and Oceania. The game as a whole isn't bad, although the combination of events seems rather strange. The graphics are fairly good in most of the events and the music at the start of the game is also nice.

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Screenshot of Star Trap

Star Trap

(French)

(Loriciels, 1989)

Reviewed by Robert Small

An icon-driven sci-fi adventure game from Loriciels, Star Trap features some impressive graphics as you explore your spaceship's interior. Using the various icons at your disposal, you can study your environment, examine objects, communicate with other characters and even use your hearing (which is an original touch) in an effort to solve the game's mystery. A game like this is all about its atmosphere and Star Trap successfully ticks that box. The game's premise is intriguing (stranded in space with murderous robots). It's obviously not an action game and does have some gameplay foibles but this is an impressive adventure game on the CPC, especially given its 16-bit origins.

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Screenshot of Star Trooper

Star Trooper

(Players, 1988)

An alien syndicate led by Jabba McGut has stolen the Earth's only supply of 25 extra-special alloys, and is now threatening life on Earth. Only a Marine Corps Star Trooper such as you will be tough enough for a mission as dangerous as this. It is your aim to recover the alloys and return them to Earth. There are five missions with five alloys of the same colour to recover in each one. You must wander around a labyrinth of corridors and lifts to find the alloys, while shooting the aliens that patrol the labyrinth. You'll also have to find keys to let you pass through force fields and use the teleportation units. The graphics are colourful and well drawn, and the sound effects are OK, but you only have one life, and all the missions are effectively the same.

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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z