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Page 1: Sabian Island - Saint and Greavsie
Page 2: St. Dragon - SAS Combat Simulator
Page 3: SAS Strike Force - Scooby Doo
Page 4: Scoop - Seabase Delta
Page 5: Seas of Blood - Sergeant Seymour Robotcop
Page 6: 750cc Grand Prix - The Shadows of Sergoth
Page 7: Shadow Warriors - Shinobi
Page 8: Shinobu - Silent Service
Page 9: Silent Shadow - Sito Pons 500cc Grand Prix
Page 10: Skateboard Joust - Skweek
Page 11: Sky Hunter - Small Games for Smart Minds
Page 12: S*M*A*S*H*E*D - Snowstrike
Page 13: Soccer Challenge - Solar Warrior
Page 14: Soldier of Light - Sorcery
Page 15: Sorcery+ - Space Froggy
Page 16: Space Gun - Space Rider
Page 17: Space Smugglers - Spherical
Page 18: Spike in Transylvania - Spooky Castle
Page 19: Sporting Triangles - Sram 2
Page 20: Stainless Steel - Stardust
Page 21: Star Firebirds - Starstrike II
Page 22: Starting Blocks - Stockmarket
Page 23: Stomp - Street Cred' Football
Page 24: Street Fighter - Strider II
Page 25: Strike! - Stunt Bike Simulator
Page 26: Stunt Car Racer - Sudoku
Page 27: Sudoku Master - Super Hang-On
Page 28: Super Hero - Super Sam
Page 29: Super Scramble Simulator - Super Tank Simulator
Page 30: SuperTed: The Search for Spot - Survivors
Page 31: Survivre - Syntax
Screenshot of Soccer Challenge

Soccer Challenge

(Alternative Software, 1990)

Despite the name of this game, you don't actually play a proper game of football; instead, the game concentrates on training. There are four types of training – dribbling, tackling, passing and penalties. When you have completed all four courses successfully, you can then go on to the assault course. The courses are all self-explanatory, except for the dribbling, in which you have to kick the ball around some cones in the direction highlighted by the arrow shown on the screen. There aren't many football training games around, mainly because they're just not as exciting as actual football games. This is no exception; the graphics are OK, but the gameplay is really dull.

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Screenshot of Soccer Director

Soccer Director

(GTi, 1990)

There are lots of football management games on the CPC, but this game instead sees you as a crooked businessman trying to buy at least 501 shares in the top ten clubs in the 1st Division. Starting with £200,000, you buy some shares and watch their value rise and fall as each team's fortune changes. Each week, you are paid a dividend through your ownership of the teams, and you can use that to buy more shares. You can also bet on a team to win the league or be relegated, and you can also call meetings to demand pay rises, ground improvements, or a new manager. There is no excitement to this game at all, mainly because it takes ages to build up enough money from your dividends, and you are forced to look at screen after screen of information after each turn. It's also written entirely in BASIC.

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Screenshot of Soccer 86

Soccer 86

(Activision/Loriciels, 1985)

Reviewed by Guillaume Chalard

The French version of this football game is known simply as Foot and was endorsed by Marius Trésor, a great French footballer who played for France in the 1982 World Cup. You can select two of four teams (Great Britain, France, Germany or Italy) and choose the level of each of your players (from 0 to 20) and your opponent's players. However, there are no differences between the different teams, save for the colour of their shirts. You automatically control the player that is closest to the ball, although pressing the fire button allows you to change the player you want to control. Once you are in possession of the ball, your speed is reduced by half, which favours a very collective method of play! In summary, it is a fast and really enjoyable game, though it isn't realistic at all.

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Screenshot of Soccer Pinball

Soccer Pinball

(Code Masters, 1992)

Soccer and pinball – when you think about it, it almost makes sense. As you'd expect, the pinball table is laid out in the form of a football pitch, the aim being to get rid of each of the defenders blocking the way, and then scoring three goals to go on to the next table – which has exactly the same layout, but with more defenders. Whether you'll actually be able to score three goals seems to be a matter of sheer fluke; the game is too difficult and the goalmouth is too small, letting down an otherwise novel concept. Out of interest, it also uses the cassette motor as a sound effect... bizarre!

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Screenshot of Soccer Rivals

Soccer Rivals

(Cult, 1991)

A football management game combined with a board game – it sounds interesting, but after a few goes you begin to realise its limitations. Three players, which can be human or computer-controlled, choose to manage one of 32 teams and take it in turns to move around the board. Each square on the board triggers an event; one type of square lets you buy new players, another lets you set up a youth team and coach, or to make improvements to your stadium, while another lets you train your players. There are also 'chance' squares which may win or lose you money. The problem is that you can only perform actions when you land on the right square, which may take one turn or ten turns. Football management games should be based on skill and not luck.

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Screenshot of Software House

Software House

(Cult, 1988)

What's it like to be the manager of your own software house and release some games? This game lets you try this out. Your aim is to survive for five years, but you start out with a budget of only £2500, and if you go more than £25,000 into debt, it's all over. In each quarter (which counts as one turn), you can select one or more games to buy, and then it's your job to organise the duplication of tapes and the artwork, packaging, price and the number of advertisements to place in magazines. After each turn, you then read the Games News magazine which has news of how well you're doing and how good or bad they think your latest game is. It's all good fun, although it can be frustrating and unpredictable most of the time.

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Screenshot of Software Star

Software Star

(Addictive, 1984)

You're a games programmer at a software house, and you want to achieve the title of Software Star. Games are developed and released, and each month you get to see how well they're doing in the software charts; getting in the top three is crucial if you want to be known, and good reviews count, too! Other tasks you have to perform include booking adverts, removing old games from your catalogue, and whether to use hype or honesty to sell your games. Any initial excitement about the game begins to wear off; even on the beginner level, it's too difficult.

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Screenshot of Solar Coaster

Solar Coaster

(Optyx, 1987)

Yawn – it's yet another Galaxian clone. This one has only four levels; three of these feature a formation of aliens hurling laser beams at you, while the fourth sees you fighting against the aliens' mothership. We've seen it all before. The graphics are actually not too bad and are quite colourful, but the sound effects are nothing special. The game itself is a bit difficult; while the alien ships whizz about the screen and fire at you (and those lasers seem to home in on you), your spacecraft moves rather slowly – but practice makes perfect. Even so, there are better games than this out there.

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Screenshot of Solar Empire

Solar Empire

(Players, 1990)

The evil Dargons have enslaved the galaxy, and you must free as many planets in the galaxy as you can. How do you do this? You must find an asteroid and shoot it, allowing you to steer it in a particular direction. Captured planets will be liberated if you manage to crash an asteroid into it. It seems like an extremely drastic method of liberating a planet, but I'm not responsible for devising this game! Obviously, you have the usual aliens to contend with, as well as the fact that your spaceship is very snake-like in both appearance and manoeuvrability. There are also several dials that tell you the nearest location of various objects. The graphics are quite good, although the screen is mostly empty space. However, for some reason, I don't really warm to this game much.

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Screenshot of Solar Warrior

Solar Warrior

(Skyslip Software, 1988)

Reviewed by Robert Small

Defend Earth's solar system in this shoot-'em-up. The game begins with a mission on Pluto. You start off at the controls of your space fighter. Immediately you come under attack from the enemy. The controls and scrolling are good and the sound effects are decent. You rendezvous with a larger ship in orbit and are tasked with landing on the planet's surface. This is a bit of an acquired taste and can be frustrating due to the controls. Once you have landed you take control of a tank with three directions of simultaneous fire and the ability to hop over crevices. The graphics are in Mode 0 and, as mentioned before, scroll well. This game offers some good horizontally scrolling action.

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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z