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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Page 1: Sabian Island - Saint and Greavsie
Page 2: St. Dragon - SAS Strike Force
Page 3: Satan - Score 3020
Page 4: The Scout Steps Out - The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole
Page 5: La Secte Noire - Seymour at the Movies
Page 6: Sgrizam - Shao Lin's Road
Page 7: Shard of Inovar - Shufflepuck Café
Page 8: Side Arms - Sir Ababol
Page 9: Sir Lancelot - Skull and Crossbones
Page 10: Skweek - S*M*A*S*H*E*D
Page 11: Smash TV - Soccer Pinball
Page 12: Soccer Rivals - Sonic Boom
Page 13: Sootland - Space Crusade
Page 14: Spaced Out! - Space Racer
Page 15: Space Rider - Spherical
Page 16: Spike in Transylvania - Sporting Triangles
Page 17: Sport of Kings - Stairway to Hell
Page 18: Star Avenger - Starion
Page 19: Starquake - Stationfall
Page 20: Steel Eagle - Stormlord
Page 21: Storm Warrior - Street Machine
Page 22: Street Warriors - Stroper
Page 23: Stryfe - Subterranean Stryker
Page 24: Subway Vigilante - Super Cycle
Page 25: Super Gran - Super Pac
Page 26: Super Pipeline II - Super Stock Car
Page 27: Super Stunt Man - Survivor
Page 28: Survivors - Syntax
Screenshot of Smash TV

Smash TV

(Ocean, 1991)

In the 21st century, a new style of game show has emerged on TV. It's fast, it's furious, and it's got action – it's Smash TV! You run around a maze of rooms, each containing several waves of monsters about to unleash their fury at you. You won't get a single moment to relax here! You can improve your weapons by collecting power-ups left behind by some of the monsters. The graphics are big and bright, although all the rooms look the same. The sound effects are good with lots of lovely explosions, but there's no music. However, it's a great game full of action and no time to take a breather.

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Screenshot of The Smirking Horror

The Smirking Horror

(WoW Software, 1991)

You're sitting in the computer room at PUE Tech on a freezing night, and a snowstorm is raging outside. It's time to finish your assignment, so you'd better get on with it – but you soon discover that all the computers are down. Bummer! Fans of Infocom's text adventures will instantly recognise the scenario, which is almost exactly the same as that of The Lurking Horror. This adventure is written using GAC, so it's unfair to expect it to match the quality of the game it's based on – but it uses GAC's features well. The author's sense of humour really shows through, especially if you've played The Lurking Horror and discover that certain things are rather different in this game! This is a really enjoyable text adventure, and is arguably one of the best GAC adventures that I've ever played.

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Screenshot of Smugglers Cove

Smugglers Cove

(CRL, 1985)

Reviewed by Pug

You, an agent to the Royal Duchy, sift through the wreckage along the shores at Daymer Cove. Finding the ship's log sends you off on a treasure hunt deep into the caves. You start this text adventure trapped in some dimly lit caves. The computer replies to your standard adventure input with classic pirate chatter – which does give this game some atmosphere. With an average level of difficulty you'll soon be solving the puzzles that lie ahead, but the crude-looking pictures, which often take an age to display, delay the pace and start to ruin your interest.

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Screenshot of Snoball in Hell

Snoball in Hell

(Atlantis, 1989)

I don't know why the word 'snoball' is spelt the way it is in this game, but you know the saying about "a snowball's chance in hell", and now you're attempting to raise hell, armed with just a few snowballs. Can you pull it off? This is a Breakout clone, using an armoured tank as a bat and a snowball as a ball. Unlike many other Breakout clones, though, the bat moves vertically and not horizontally, and there are also plenty of monsters which fly towards you. They can be hard to dodge, but you soon learn to hold down the fire button more or less constantly. The graphics are very colourful, but there's nothing that makes it better than similar games.

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Screenshot of Snooker Management

Snooker Management

(Cult, 1990)

A snooker management game? What kind of lunatic thought of this? It's one of Cult's terrible efforts at writing management games, being written entirely in BASIC with no graphics to speak of. You start bottom of the world rankings and have to play in tournaments and earn prize money to make it all the way to the top. You can also arrange matches with other players and gamble your money on other players. The big problem is that you have to sit through other players' games, and of course, your own games. It is duller than watching paint dry, and even die-hard snooker fans will loathe this sorry excuse for a game.

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Screenshot of Snowball

Snowball

(Level 9, 1984)

Reviewed by Richard Lamond

Join Kim Kimberley, secret agent extraordinaire as you attempt to save the interstellar transport Snowball 9 from certain disaster. Waking from hypersleep you literally begin the game in the dark – but escaping your coffin is only the beginning of your problems... Level 9's first foray into science fiction is a difficult but atmospheric text adventure thanks to some well crafted descriptions. Working out how to deal with the syringe-wielding nightingales will be your first major stumbling block, but that pales in comparison to the maze (a highly frustrating piece of coding that exists seemingly to allow Level 9 to boast of the game having over 7,000 locations). Originally text-only, Snowball was reissued as part of the Silicon Dreams compilation boasting graphics, but it loses part of its mystique in the process. Overall, it's still a highly polished adventure that you can easily lose a couple of hours playing.

See also: Return to Eden, The Worm in Paradise.

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Screenshot of Soccer Challenge

Soccer Challenge

(Alternative Software, 1990)

Despite the name of this game, you don't actually play a proper game of football; instead, the game concentrates on training. There are four types of training – dribbling, tackling, passing and penalties. When you have completed all four courses successfully, you can then go on to the assault course. The courses are all self-explanatory, except for the dribbling, in which you have to kick the ball around some cones in the direction highlighted by the arrow shown on the screen. There aren't many football training games around, mainly because they're just not as exciting as actual football games. This is no exception; the graphics are OK, but the gameplay is really dull.

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Screenshot of Soccer Director

Soccer Director

(GTi, 1990)

There are lots of football management games on the CPC, but this game instead sees you as a crooked businessman trying to buy at least 501 shares in the top ten clubs in the 1st Division. Starting with £200,000, you buy some shares and watch their value rise and fall as each team's fortune changes. Each week, you are paid a dividend through your ownership of the teams, and can use that to buy more shares. You can also bet on a team to win the league or be relegated, and you can also call meetings to demand pay rises, ground improvements, or a new manager. There is no excitement to this game at all, mainly because it takes ages to build up enough money from your dividends, and you are forced to look at screen after screen of information after each turn. It's also written entirely in BASIC.

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Screenshot of Soccer 86

Soccer 86

(Activision/Loriciels, 1985)

Reviewed by Guillaume Chalard

The French version of this football game is known as Marius Tresor Foot, after a great French footballer who played for France in the 1982 World Cup. You can select two of four teams (Great Britain, France, Germany or Italy) and choose the level of each of your players (from 0 to 20) and your opponent's players. However, there are no differences between the different teams, save for the colour of their shirts. You automatically control the player that is closest to the ball, although pressing the fire button allows you to change the player you want to control. Once you are in possession of the ball, your speed is reduced by half, which favours a very collective method of play! Eventually, it is a fast and really enjoyable game, though it isn't realistic at all.

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Screenshot of Soccer Pinball

Soccer Pinball

(Code Masters, 1992)

Soccer and pinball – when you think about it, it almost makes sense. As you'd expect, the pinball table is laid out in the form of a football pitch, the aim being to get rid of each of the defenders blocking the way, and then scoring three goals to go on to the next table – which has exactly the same layout, but with more defenders. Whether you'll actually be able to score three goals seems to be a matter of sheer fluke; the game is too difficult and the goalmouth is too small, letting down an otherwise novel concept. Out of interest, it also uses the cassette motor as a sound effect... bizarre!

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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z