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Page 1: Lab Escape - Lawn Tennis
Page 2: Lazer Tag - Leviathan
Page 3: Liberator - Live and Let Die
Page 4: Liverpool - Los Angeles SWAT
Page 5: Lost Caves and the Tomb of Doom - The Lurking Horror
Screenshot of Liberator
Liberator
(Proein Soft Line, 1989)

Once again, Earth has been invaded by an alien army who have somehow arrived undetected – until now. Armed with an automatic machine gun that you managed to wrestle from one of the alien soldiers, you must reach their underground control centre and destroy it. This horizontally scrolling shoot-'em-up takes place over three levels, and right from the start, a relentless stream of aliens will attack you from both sides. The sheer number of them severely hinders your progress as you are continually turning around to fire at them. There are power-ups available, but you'll be concentrating so much on firing at the aliens that they'll disappear before you can collect them! It's a shame that the difficulty level is so high, because the graphics are quite colourful, albeit cartoon-like.

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Screenshot of Licence to Kill
Licence to Kill
(Domark, 1989)

James Bond is on the trail of the drugs baron Franz Sanchez, after his friend Felix Leiter is kidnapped at his own wedding. In doing so, M, the head of MI6, revokes his Licence to Kill. The game consists of five levels, each based on a scene from the film. Among the scenes are a helicopter chase where you blow up Sanchez's jeep while dodging bullets, a shoot-'em-up section in the grounds of a warehouse in which you try to scare off Sanchez's henchmen (the best bit of the game, which requires some strategic thinking), and the tanker chase in which you must ram the tankers transporting Sanchez's drugs. This is the best of the five James Bond games that were released for the CPC, with great graphics and music, and a wide variety of action-packed gameplay, although the first level is a bit too tough.

See also: Live and Let Die, The Living Daylights, The Spy Who Loved Me, A View to a Kill.

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Screenshot of Life Expectancy Zero
Life Expectancy Zero
(Blaby, 1985)

Tron has always been a classic game, but this is an uninspiring version of it. You have to play against the computer light cycles and try to trap them and cause them to crash into their own trails. The first level contains only one light cycle, with another being added until there are five; after that, you play the five levels again, but at a slightly faster pace. The graphics are good when you consider other versions of this game, but it's much too easy, since the computer-controlled light cycles are quite stupid and will trap themselves without you having to do it for them.

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Screenshot of Lifeterm
Lifeterm
(Alternative, 1987)

In the year 3147, Jake Stalin was sent to the planetoid of Souzel to serve a life sentence for murder, and he now wants to escape... but how is he going to do it? This is a text adventure created using GAC, and let's just say that it's not very good at all. The locations are laid out in a very illogical manner and it's easy to get lost, and the first few commands that you need to type to make any progress are really obscure (the answers are to send an SOS, lock the pilot in the store, and send the droid to the ship – so now you know). The graphics are OK but it's very hard to know what you should do.

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Screenshot of The Light Corridor
The Light Corridor
(Infogrames, 1990)

Breakout gets a twist here as you bounce a ball down a never-ending corridor full of barriers and obstacles. Along the way, there are several types of power-ups to collect, and every four levels, there's a task to be solved, such as aiming the ball at a target, or hitting it several times; only when you complete it within the time limit can you progress to the next set of corridors. The graphics are impressive, and if you have 128K of memory, there are several excellent tunes, and you even get some digitised speech. In addition, there's a facility to design your own corridors, and a code for each corridor means that you won't have to play the ones you've completed over again. One other thing – select 'fast control' from the options menu; the game is much easier if you use this.

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Screenshot of Light Force
Light Force (AA)
(FTL, 1986)

The planet of Regulus is under attack by alien forces, so the GEM council sends out their entire army, which consists of exactly one Lightforce fighter, to destroy the aliens. Guess who the pilot of this fighter is? This is a vertically scrolling space shoot-'em-up which is full of action from start to finish. There is a wide variety of aliens which approach in waves, and thankfully it's easy to learn their formations and the best way to defeat them. Control centres also appear every so often, and shooting them all gives you extra lives at the end of each of the four levels. The graphics and sound effects are both excellent, and it's a challenging game, whether you're a novice or a hardened shoot-'em-up fan.

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Screenshot of Line of Fire
Line of Fire
(US Gold, 1990)

You've infiltrated enemy lines and captured their secret, high-power machine gun unit – but now you're going to need to use the weapon to fight your way out, as you enter the line of fire. The game uses a perspective view, and enemy soldiers and vehicles come towards you. You must simply shoot them, or use smart bombs to kill everything on the screen, although you only have two of these available at the start of the game. However, more can be collected by shooting caskets, and shooting first aid kits allows you to recover some of your energy. The graphics are poor and very messy, and the scrolling is slow and jerky. The few sound effects that exist are also bad (although the music on the menu is good), and all of this makes the game dull and unexciting.

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Screenshot of Little Computer People
Little Computer People
(Activision, 1987)

There are bizarre games, and then there's this one – but can you call it a game at all? When you first run the game, you are assigned your own Little Computer Person (it's always male), and you watch him and his dog move into his house and settle in. Then, in subsequent sessions, you just leave the computer switched on as he goes about life, doing exercises, watching TV, playing the piano, using the telephone (who does he talk to?), and so on. You'll also have to watch his food and water supply, and you can also type in commands to get him to play games or write a letter to you. It is fun to watch him at first, but the novelty will wear off sooner or later.

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Screenshot of Little Puff in Dragonland
Little Puff in Dragonland
(Codemasters, 1989)

Little Puff went to explore Dragonland, but he has become lost and wants to go home. However, two guards won't let him home unless he finds four pieces of a pass and pays a toll. This is an arcade adventure which is similar to the Dizzy series – but it's not as good. Working out what objects are needed isn't difficult, although there are several objects which have no use. The ugly, Spectrum-like graphics are a bit off-putting, despite some clever techniques being used to display extra colours on the screen. The main reason why the game isn't that good, however, is that you only have one life, and it is so easy for Puff to be killed – a mistimed jump, or a fall into one of the many traps. It would be much better if you were given three lives.

See also: DJ Puff.

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Screenshot of Live and Let Die
Live and Let Die
(Domark/Elite, 1988)

A drugs baron called Dr. Kananga has killed three British agents, and it's up to James Bond to find him and destroy his drug processing plant. The only real link to the film in this game is the use of a speedboat. You can choose one of three missions in the Arctic, the Sahara or New Orleans, although it might be best to start with the practice level in which you fire at targets. Each of the missions sees you piloting the speedboat along a river, firing at enemy speedboats and planes, and dodging rocks and mines. You also need to collect fuel canisters regularly. The graphics are good and the scrolling is fast and smooth, but for some reason, the gameplay seems to be fairly average and lacks something.

See also: Licence to Kill, The Living Daylights, The Spy Who Loved Me, A View to a Kill.

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