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Page 1: Lab Escape - Lawn Tennis
Page 2: Lazer Tag - Leviathan
Page 3: Liberator - Live and Let Die
Page 4: Liverpool - Los Angeles SWAT
Page 5: Lost Caves and the Tomb of Doom - The Lurking Horror
Screenshot of Lazer Tag
Lazer Tag (Advert)
(Go!, 1988)

In the year 3010, Lazer Tag is the ultimate sport. You are a new recruit at the Lazer Tag training school, aiming to progress through the ranks. Each level of the game consists of two stages – a shoot-out, in which you must shoot all the other players and reach the other side of the arena before your time runs out, and a target section, in which you move along a fixed path and try to be as accurate as possible in shooting the other players. The arena is made up of mirrors and walls which deflect your laser beams, and in some cases multiply them. The graphics are colourful while not being brilliant, although the music quickly becomes irritating and doesn't really suit the nature of the game. It's a reasonable game and fun for a while, although ultimately, all the levels are very similar.

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Screenshot of Leader Board
Leader Board
(US Gold, 1986)
Reviewed by CPC4eva

Leader Board took golfing to new heights in the 1980s and quite possibly was the franchise that made golfing computer games popular. The Amstrad CPC version, while resembling the original, is lacking in quite a few departments, as it looks and sounds rather bland in comparison. You pick up your clubs and can play from 18 holes up to 72, by yourself or with up to three other players, and you can choose from novice, amateur or professional level of difficulty. It's rather slow going drawing the hole on the screen and then re-drawing it for your next shot. Everything seems easy enough, selecting clubs and judging your power and swing on each shot, but putting is quite a challenge and this is probably where you will pick up your monitor and throw it out the window. If you manage to master all four courses, there's another set of courses available in Leader Board Tournament.

See also: World Class Leaderboard.

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5

Screenshot of Leather Goddesses of Phobos
Leather Goddesses of Phobos
(Infocom, 1986)
Reviewed by Richard Lamond

Starting in an Ohio bar in 1936, and stopping only for a quick lavatory break, you are quickly incarcerated by the Leather Goddesses of Phobos as part of their grand plan to turn the Earth into their personal pleasure dome – and only you can stop them. Renowned for their adult-themed adventures, Infocom went the extra mile by making a game packed with sexual references that allowed you to play either a male or female protagonist (depending on your choice of bathroom at the beginning). As ever, Infocom's adventure is not limited to what you see on the screen; the original package included a comic and a 'scratch and sniff' card (that thankfully remains tasteful). With no graphics to rely on, the game depends on the quality of the text and here it excels, jam-packed with humour that keeps you coming back for one more go. Worth a go.

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8

Screenshot of LED Storm
LED Storm
(Go!, 1989)

Drive a high-powered futuristic car across nine fast and furious stages in a race to reach Sky City. It's a crazy race, with many other cars competing in each stage and generally getting in your way. Your car is able to perform huge jumps, but for some reason it doesn't have any weapons. You can collect extra energy and fuel during each stage, but one of the problems with the game is that the entire screen is used for displaying the track; there is no status display at all, so you have no idea how well you're doing. The graphics are very crude and lack colour despite being drawn in the CPC's high-colour, low-resolution mode, the scrolling is jerky, and there is no music and only a few sound effects – not even any engine noises. Although the game plays at a reasonably fast pace, it all feels rather empty and lacking in excitement.

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5

Screenshot of Lee Enfield: Space Ace
Lee Enfield: Space Ace
(Infogrames, 1988)
Reviewed by Guillaume Chalard

This French shoot-'em-up (known as Bob Morane: Science Fiction over there) takes place in a space station, where you must shoot enemy soldiers and various dangerous creatures before they attack you. The gameplay is much like that of Prohibition from the same developer. A little arrow on your cursor indicates the position of your targets. You only have a few seconds to spot and kill them before they open fire. There are many levels, which are very similar; only the background colour and a few details change from one screen to the next. The speed increases as you progress forward, making the game more and more difficult. The graphics are very good and the scrolling is really smooth. Overall, this is a good shooting game that unfortunately lacks variety and quickly becomes boring.

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6

Screenshot of The Legend of Apache Gold
The Legend of Apache Gold (Advert)
(Incentive/Medallion, 1987)

The cowboy Luke Warme is broke, but after hearing tales of gold around the Indian burial ground, he sets off in pursuit of riches. After being captured by Apache Indians, he finds himself and his horse in their settlement. This is a text adventure written using GAC – in fact, it's one of the adventures that Incentive sold in order to showcase how good the program really is. The graphics are fine by GAC standards, and it's an easy adventure to get into, although one rather annoying feature is that most objects can't be examined – instead the message "You see nothing special" is displayed. It's still OK for newcomers to text adventures to play, though.

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7

Screenshot of Legend of Kage
Legend of Kage
(Imagine, 1986)

Princess Kiri was walking in the forest with a young ninja called Kage when she was kidnapped by the evil Dragon King. Now Kage must journey to the Dragon King's palace and rescue her. Your quest begins in the forest, where you must kill twenty ninjas and face the Dragon King himself several times. Then you travel to the palace and must defeat ten more ninjas before you can scale the walls and confront the Dragon King for the final time. First impressions of this game are quite good; the screen scrolls smoothly, Kage jumps from tree to tree with gravity-defying ease, there's a nice lightning effect that lights up the sky, and the music suits the game well. However, if you lose a life, you have to restart the level all over again, which is very annoying indeed. The difficulty of the first level will put a lot of players off.

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5

Screenshot of Lemmings
Lemmings
(Psygnosis, 1992)

Everyone has heard of this game, which came out on nearly every computer there is. It also scored 97% in Amstrad Action – their highest rating ever. In hindsight, it doesn't deserve that much. In each of the 60 levels, lemmings fall out of a box and just walk around until you tell them to do something. You have to get a certain number of lemmings to the exit to complete the level. It's fun to play, although it does move at a rather leisurely pace, and even though the lemmings themselves are extremely blocky, the graphics are great, and if you have 128K of memory, there are over a dozen excellent tunes to hum to.

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8

Screenshot of Let's Go!
Let's Go!
(Morri, 2015)
Reviewed by Missas

Let's Go! is a very original idea that has been translated into a smart and addictive game. You control a cute sprite whose mission is to reach the flag in a non-scrolling, single-screen level. Nevertheless, it is not as easy as it may sound because once your hero starts running he doesn't want to stop! The player can only stop him temporarily and hold him there as long as the SPACE bar or joystick fire button is held down. All the other actions are performed by the sprite. Fortunately, the collision detection is perfect. The graphics are colourful MODE 0 and cartoonish, while the sound consists of basic effects. It is better this way because from time to time it can be really frustrating to progress to the next level. The grab factor is very strong. Overall, I rate it more highly than its technical aspects deserve, because of its originality.

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8

Screenshot of Leviathan
Leviathan
(English, 1987)

This isometric space shoot-'em-up was apparently inspired by the music video for ZZ Top's song Rough Boy – though it's difficult to see what inspiration the authors drew from it. You control the Leviathan spaceship, and you must shoot waves of aliens as they appear on the screen. You are also armed with a small number of smart bombs which destroy all the aliens on the screen. You'll also need to replenish your fuel by shooting spinning cubes. To add a little variety, you can choose one of three landscapes to fly around – Moonscape, Cityscape and Greekscape. However, there just isn't enough in this game to keep you interested; it can often seem like ages before another wave of aliens appears, and your spaceship is incredibly awkward to handle, making it difficult to fire at, and avoid, the aliens. The only good aspect of this game is the excellent music (which doesn't sound remotely like ZZ Top!).

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