D

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Page 1: Daley Thompson's Decathlon – Danger Mouse in Makin' Whoopee
Page 2: Danger Street – Dawnssley
Page 3: D-Day – Death or Glory
Page 4: Death Pit – Defcom 1
Page 5: Defence – Desert Fox
Page 6: Desolator – Digger Barnes
Page 7: Disc – Dr. Scrimes' Spook School
Page 8: Doctor Who and the Mines of Terror – Doodle Bug
Page 9: Doomsday Blues – Dragon Attack
Page 10: Dragon Breed – Duck Out
Page 11: The Duct – Dynamic Duo
Page 12: Dynamite Dan – Dynasty Wars
Screenshot of Desolator

Desolator

(US Gold, 1988)

Mac has ventured into the Halls of Kairos to free the infants that the evil Kairos is holding captive. As Mac, you must explore the five levels of Kairos’ castle, avoiding the henchmen and fire demons that will drain your energy. Punching symbols hanging on the walls next to mirrors releases the infants trapped behind them, and if enough infants are collected, the border turns red and Mac’s energy loss is greatly reduced. Reaching the end of each level sees Mac fighting off several disembodied heads that wander around the screen spitting fireballs. This is a mediocre game with little variety in the gameplay. The graphics are average and there are few sound effects, and it’s also far too easy. However, the most serious flaw is in the layout of certain levels; it is possible to become completely stuck in a room with no means of escape, and you will have to reload the entire game!

More information on CPCSOFTS

5

Screenshot of Desperado 2

Desperado 2

(Topo Soft, 1989)

Wild West action awaits in the town of Devil Stone in this two-part shoot-’em-up. The first part is a horizontally scrolling affair in which you shoot all the cowboys you can manage. They walk towards you and will also shoot from windows. If you’re hit by bullets, you lose energy, but if you touch any cowboys, you lose one of your three lives. The second part is set in a saloon where the customers take aim at you one at a time, and you must kill them before they fire their gun and kill you. The graphics are beautiful in both parts, and although the first part may seem very difficult, it isn’t once you get the hang of it, although there should be more restart points. The second part is good as well, but relies a lot on luck, and if you are shot, you have to start all over again.

See also: Gunsmoke.

More information on CPCSOFTS

7

Screenshot of Despotik Design

Despotik Design

(Ere Informatique, 1987)

Deep in the centre of the earth is a network of rooms where life-bearing cells are generated. However, a hacker has altered the programming of these cells, and it is your mission to restore the programming to its normal state. On each of the many screens, a cell is generated at the yellow door and bounces off walls and tiles towards the red door – the door of evil. You have to move the arrow tiles so that the cell is guided towards the green door – the door of life. You have a magnetic key that can be dropped in order to move the tiles, but watch out for the robots! Also be aware that certain robots, as well as the cells, will kill you instantly if you touch them, depending on whether or not you’re carrying the magnetic key. It sounds confusing, but if you like a mixture of puzzle-solving and arcade action, this is the type of game you’ll enjoy.

More information on CPCSOFTS

7

Screenshot of Deva Drifter

Deva Drifter

(Albertoven, 2020)

There are plenty of single-screen racing games on the CPC, but this one offers very realistic physics. You have to race your car on several tracks (five in the free download version) and complete a set number of laps within the time limit; there are no other cars to compete against. If you hit the edges of the track too hard, you are penalised by being unable to accelerate for a few seconds. Where this game differs from others like it is your ability to drift around corners, leaving tyre marks on the track and emitting squeals from your CPC’s speaker. Another feature is the use of subpixel rendering to display the car smoothly at 50 frames per second. It’s great fun to play, although the car can be quite tricky to control on some surfaces. It’s just a shame that hardly any effort seems to have been directed at the background graphics, which are very crudely drawn indeed.

More information on CPCSOFTS

8

Screenshot of The Devil’s Crown

The Devil’s Crown

(Probe Software, 1985)

Reviewed by Guillaume Chalard

You’re exploring a sunken ship, trying to find a lost golden crown. You’ll first have to collect many treasures hidden in the darker places of the ship, avoiding ghosts and having enough oxygen to survive. This is the kind of Sorcery-style game that you love to play, even though the graphics aren’t brilliant, the sound effects are poor and the action is rather repetitive. Anyway, it will keep you in front of your screen for a few hours, because you always want to discover new treasures.

More information on CPCSOFTS

6

Screenshot of Diamond Mine

Diamond Mine

(Blue Ribbon, 1986)

Reviewed by Pug

A Nibbler variant in which you collect dots (I mean diamonds). Your character in this game stands above ground and pumps away as your mining line moves through the underground maze. Come into contact with any of the inhabitants head-on and you kill them, but if they touch your line, you lose a life. It’s a dated-looking game, but one that slowly grew on me. It requires a lot of concentration and strategy.

More information on CPCSOFTS

5

Screenshot of Dianne

Dianne

(Loriciels, 1985)

Little Dianne has to collect 160 diamonds scattered over four levels, and deposit them in several safes, which can be found on each level. Of course, there are a lot of monsters which try to stop her from doing this, and on each screen, they will try to block your way as much as possible, although there are gates which you can swing open to kill them temporarily. You can move between the levels by finding the teleport, even if you haven’t collected all the diamonds on a level. It’s nothing original at all, and the graphics and overall presentation of the game look really dated.

More information on CPCSOFTS

4

Screenshot of Dick Tracy

Screenshot taken from cartridge version of game

Dick Tracy

(Disney, 1991)

The famous comic strip detective must rescue his girlfriend, Tess Trueheart, who has been kidnapped by Big Boy Caprice and his gang. The game involves lots of shooting and beating up Caprice’s henchmen, some of whom are heavily armed. Occasionally they will leave behind guns which you can collect, but their supply of ammunition is limited. The film that this game is based on was memorable for using only primary colours, and the graphics in the normal CPC version retain this theme, although they are blocky and poorly defined. The cartridge version has much better graphics (as you would expect), uses scrolling instead of flick-screen action, and makes great use of the extra capabilities of the Plus machines. Note that my rating is for the cartridge version; the normal CPC version only deserves a rating of 6 out of 10.

View an advertisement for this game

More information on CPCSOFTS

8

Screenshot of Die Alien Slime

Die Alien Slime

(Mastertronic, 1989)

An alien breeding experiment on the spaceship Taccia has gone badly wrong and the ship is now overrun with alien species. You are the last remaining human on board, and it is your task to set the self-destruct mechanisms on board the ship and find the escape pod. Energy barriers and teleporters provide access to other parts of the spaceship, but you’ll need to find the correct tokens to be able to switch them on and off, and you’ll also need to find a computer terminal nearby. While this shoot-’em-up may have a marvellous title, it doesn’t live up to expectations. Although the action is fast and smooth, most of the rooms are fairly spartan, with hardly any variety in the aliens that you can kill and objects to collect being scattered very thinly.

More information on CPCSOFTS

5

Screenshot of Digger Barnes

Digger Barnes

(Cable, 1985)

Reviewed by Pug

In this platform game, you move around and clear away the monsters by digging holes in the floor. The controls are responsive, but the monsters move a little too fast at times. When you clear a screen, new monsters appear, but the layout of the platforms and ladders on the next screen remains the same – yet if you lose a life, the layout changes. Each new screen places more monsters randomly on the screen, meaning that you may be unlucky in your current postion. Average visuals and limited sound effects. Presentation-wise, this game looks a little bare.

More information on CPCSOFTS

4

Back to top

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z